Perspectives

Yvonne Chaka Chaka

United Nations Equality Champion, President at the Princess of Africa Foundation, and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

 

“Like millions of South Africans who grew up during the Apartheid years, I know what it feels like to be treated as a second class citizen in my own country.

Today, we can look back with pride at South Africa’s progress, but we must never forget the painful lessons of the past. Discrimination on any basis hurts people, it scars whole communities and, ultimately, it impoverishes us all.”

 

Randy W. Berry

U.S. State Department Special Envoy for the Human Rights of LGBTI Persons

 

“Discriminatory laws are also detrimental to business and economic development, threatening the stability that businesses desire, risking the safety of their employees, and jeopardizing productive economic relationships that can advance business interests all over the world.

In my role as Special Envoy for the Human Rights of LGBTI Persons, I engage with all sectors of society to protect and promote the universal human rights of all people, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) persons.”

 

M. V. Lee Badgett

 

Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Public Policy & Administration, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 

 

“The power of this economic case is that it gives a roadmap for companies and countries that want all of their workers and citizens to contribute fully.

Even in a field dominated by numbers and math, economists know that it all begins with people. Innovative products require somebody’s ideas and imagination. People work to produce goods and services that other human beings value. People buy the things and services they value and can afford. Both in firms and for larger national economies, these people whose economic contributions are central to growth include many LGBT people. How can we make sure that LGBT people can contribute fully to our national economies and businesses in all of these roles?”

 

Liz Bingham

 

Managing Partner – Talent UK & Ireland, EY

 

“We need an environment where people are prepared to speak up and speak out and challenge the status quo: that is what is going to drive better performance.

For me, the notion of growth is key: growth for an individual, for a business, or indeed for an economy. That means growth which is driven by innovation, entrepreneurship and risk taking. And for this, we need an environment where people are prepared to speak up and speak out and challenge the status quo: that is what is going to drive better performance. The only way to grow sustainably is serial innovation – and, as the evidence in this report shows, the only way to serially innovate is to have diverse teams led in an inclusive way.”

 

Claudia Brind-Woody

 

Vice President & Managing Director for Global Intellectual Property Licensing, IBM

“We’re not a Johnny-come-lately to the inclusion question. Inclusion is in our DNA because we had courageous leadership from the early days.

IBM has a really long history of non-discrimination going back to Thomas Watson Snr. And Thomas Watson Jnr., who were CEOs of IBM. They ‘got it’ right back in 1953, when Watson Jnr. wrote a policy letter making it clear that there would be no discrimination in the company. Back then, the words were about race and creed; then they were about gender – because that was the focal point at the time.”

 

Daniel Danso

 

Diversity Manager, Linklaters LLP

“As the world and business changes, new Millennial talent is coming in, and they want different things from before: they want a vibrant workplace that is open and diverse.

As the world and business changes, new Millennial talent is coming in, and they want different things from before: they want a vibrant workplace that is open and diverse. Businesses need to recognize this, or they will never be able to attract, retain and develop, the right talent. They will lose out to businesses that are bolder, that welcome diverse communities, and show them they understand where they are coming from.”

 

Joshua Graff

 

Senior Director, LinkedIn Europe, Middle East & Africa, LinkedIn

“Since economic performance is one of the key measures of success of any government, we hope this will be an impetus for countries to further embrace diversity.

Our mission at LinkedIn is to connect the world’s professionals and make them more productive and successful. Our long-term vision is to create economic opportunity for the world’s professionals, and inclusion and diversity are key to making this happen.”

 

Tim Murphy

 

General Counsel and Chief Franchise Officer at MasterCard

“Diversity and inclusion has been an essential part of helping the company open up to the wider world.

When LGBT equality was being debated in the U.S., we spoke clearly and candidly about where we stood on the issue. Our friends, colleagues and partners who are part of our lives all deserve the same treatment, as a matter of human decency. It was central to what we believe to be right and to our commitment to diversity.”

 

Patsy Doerr

Global Head of Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion at Thomson

“We need to be out there taking a clear position on this issue.

One of the things which struck me when I joined Thomson Reuters is that, by the nature of what we do, we are diverse. With a presence in one hundred countries, we’re so global in our reach. We’re providing information and news daily to so many different types of industries, corporations, governments. So the very nature of what we do involves bringing diversity of experience, skills and thought to the table.”

 

Alison McFadyen

Group Head, US Supervisory Remediation Programme at Standard Chartered

“We truly believe diversity across all dimensions is important. For us, it’s part of our brand promise.

I have the role of Sponsor for our Global LGBT and Allies Network at Standard Chartered. As a global company, we operate in places which have a vast range of attitudes and approaches to LGBT inclusion and in some of them it is especially hard to create a safe and welcoming environment for members of the LGBT community.”