A path towards LGBT+ inclusion

Towards LGBT+ inclusion

The anti-LGBT+ policies pursued in some countries run counter to the path towards inclusion taken by most of the international community. In many parts of the world, there is a growing culture of respect for LGBT+ individuals, and their ability to fully participate in society is protected by law.

The anti-LGBT+ policies pursued in some countries run counter to the path towards inclusion taken by most of the international community. In many parts of the world, there is a growing culture of respect for LGBT+ individuals, and their ability to fully participate in society is protected by law.

Protections against hate crimes or incitement based on sexual orientation

Countries protecting LGBT+ people against hate crime or incitement is growing steadily: 43 and 39 states respectively.

Hate crime: countries criminalizing acts of violence based on sexual orientation

Adoption rights for same-sex couples

Joint adoption by same-sex couples is now legal in 26 countries. Legalization is supported by the findings of professional organizations such as the American Psychological Association, who have found no evidence that same-sex parenting causes any harm to the child.

Joint adoption by same-sex couples

Employment protections against discrimination

72 countries (37% of UN States) have laws that protect the right to earn a living free from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and this number is growing steadily: since 2010, 16 countries have enacted anti-discrimination legislation. This kind of protection does not in itself guarantee LGBT+ inclusion in the workplace, but it sets an important context and provides the possibility of legal remedy.

Employment: countries prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation

Marriage for same-sex couples

“Marriage equality” is a high-water mark for society’s acceptance and recognition of same-sex couples. The number of countries legalizing same-sex marriage has increased steadily since the Netherlands became the first country to do so in 2001. Australia, Finland, Germany and Taiwan are among the most recent to take steps toward marriage equality.

Marriage equality: countries recognizing same-sex marriage

Legal recognition of gender identify rights

In most countries the law still recognizes only two traditional gender identities – male and female. Although understanding of non-binary genders is growing, social attitudes and national laws are slow to adapt. However, an increasing number of countries now recognize sex reassignment, permitting individuals to change the legal gender on their birth certificate.

Gender identity: countries recognizing sex reassignment